HomeVeterans2010Display vol 1

VIB Banner

Chuck Yeager

Retired United States Air Force Brig. Gen. Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager prepares to board an F-15D Eagle from the 65th Aggressor Squadron Oct. 14, 2012, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. In a jet piloted by Capt. David Vincent, 65th AGRS pilot, Yeager is commemorating the 65th anniversary of his historic breaking of the sound barrier flight Oct. 14, 1947, in the Bell X-1 rocket research plane named "Glamorous Glennis." Yeager was awarded the prestigious Collier Trophy in 1948 for this landmark aeronautical achievement. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Jason W. Edwards)

Retired United States Air Force Brig. Gen. Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager prepares to board an F-15D Eagle from the 65th Aggressor Squadron Oct. 14, 2012, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. In a jet piloted by Capt. David Vincent, 65th AGRS pilot, Yeager is commemorating the 65th anniversary of his historic breaking of the sound barrier flight Oct. 14, 1947, in the Bell X-1 rocket research plane named "Glamorous Glennis." Yeager was awarded the prestigious Collier Trophy in 1948 for this landmark aeronautical achievement. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Jason W. Edwards)

Major General (Ret.) Chuck Yeager is famous for being the first pilot to exceed the speed of Mach 1.  In 1976, he was awarded a Congressional Silver Medal in recognition of having broken the sound barrier in the experimental aircraft Bell X1 in 1947. Yeager enlisted as a Private in the Army Air Forces in 1941 and became an aircraft mechanic. He demonstrated a natural ability as a pilot and received his wings and a promotion to flight officer in 1943. During World War II, he distinguished himself by becoming an Ace by shooting down five enemy aircraft in a single day. After the war, he transitioned into the Air Force to become a test pilot. In 1997, General Yeager ended more than 50 years of flying for the Air Force as an Ace fighter pilot, test pilot, commander and consultant. During a speech after his final flight, he stated, “All that I am … I owe to the Air Force.”

In 2004, Congress voted to authorize President George W. Bush to promote Yeager to the rank of Major General.