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Norman Ransom

Staff Sgt (Sep.) Norman Ransom voluntarily the Air Force in July 1967, despite being drafted into the Army. At the time, Ransom was enrolled at Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls, Texas, with the goal to become an Air Force officer. Running out of deferments, he decided to enlist into the Air Force as a motion picture camera operator. Ransom provided video documentation of Air Force missions in both the United States and overseas locations. He also recorded aerial footage of the closing of Da Nang Air Base in Vietnam. Ransom recalls his role with the 6594th Test Group as the highlight of his career, where he recorded Airmen catching ejected film canisters from the United States’ early spy satellites in a JC-130 aircraft. Ransom separated in 1971 and rejoined the following year, 1972, as an emergency management specialist. He then moved to an instructor position teaching emergency operations at Andrews Air Force Base, Md. After his final separation from military service in 1981, Ransom returned to school and earned his Master’s degree in Psychology from Bowie State University in 1993. Looking back at his career, Ransom is thankful for the discipline the Air Force taught him as well as his leadership abilities. He continues to further his education and research with the goal to eventually write a book about his life and experiences. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kyle Gese/Released)

Staff Sgt (Sep.) Norman Ransom

Staff Sgt. (Sep.) Norman Ransom voluntarily joined the Air Force in July 1967, despite being drafted into the Army. Ransom provided video documentation of Air Force missions in both the United States and overseas locations. He also recorded aerial footage of the closing of Da Nang Air Base, Vietnam. Ransom separated in 1971 and reenlisted the following year. After his final separation from military service in 1981, he returned to school and earned his master’s degree in Counseling Psychology from Bowie State University in 1993. Looking back at his career, Ransom is thankful for the discipline and leadership abilities the Air Force provided him. He continues to further his education and research with the goal to eventually write a book about his life and experiences and plans to donate a majority of the profits to the Wounded Warrior Project.